TARGET CLIENTELE

Target clients include professionals and employees who are facing disciplinary action and the risk of losing their right to practice their profession. This includes:

   ·      Engineers

   ·      Physicians, Nurses & other Healthcare Professionals

   ·      Immigration Consultants

   ·      Insurance Brokers

   ·      Financial Services Professionals

   ·      Members of other Regulated Professions

   ·   General Employees

 

WHAT IS ADMINISTRATIVE LAW?

Generally, administrative law is the branch of law that regulates bodies which exercise government powers. This includes government ministries, tribunals and licensing bodies that regulate certain professions.

Whenever the government makes a decision or creates rules that affect the rights and interests of citizens, principles of administrative law will usually apply.

 

YOU MAY HAVE AN ADMINISTRATIVE LAW PROBLEM IF:

a)       You are facing a disciplinary matter before a professional regulatory body. E.g. you are an engineer, physician or healthcare professional, immigration consultant, insurance broker, financial services professional, or a member of other regulated professions.

b)      Any benefit that you receive from, or through the government is in danger of being withdrawn. E.g. You are an immigration consultant whose ability to recruit workers through a government program is under review.

c)       You have a dispute involving certain subject matter that lawmakers have directed away from the courts (at least in the first instance). E.g. Disputes involving landlords and tenant, employment situations, and human rights complaints are often heard by administrative tribunals. The decisions of these tribunals can be appealed to the Courts but they will only be overturned in limited circumstances.

 

ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNALS

Given the broad scope of organizations that exercise government-like powers, administrative law applies in many contexts. One of the forums that such disputes are decided is through the work of administrative tribunals. These bodies have powers that are similar to the courts.

Tribunal processes tend to be simpler, faster, more informal and affordable that the regular court system. This means that parties can often represent themselves without a lawyer. However, it is still  advisable to seek legal counsel. Tribunals deal with significant legal issues that often require legal expertise.

Tribunal adjudicators (decision-makers) tend to be individuals whose professional or personal backgrounds make them suited to decide matters within the tribunal’s scope of responsibility. An adjudicator on an agricultural tribunal may have a farming background. A tribunal dealing with employment and labour issues may retain adjudicators with a legal background in that area.

Examples of administrative tribunals in Saskatchewan include:

   ·      Labour Relations Board

   ·      Worker’s Compensation Board

   ·      The Auto Injury Appeal Commission

   ·      Saskatchewan Financial Services Commission

   ·      Office of Residential Tenancies

   ·      Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission

Examples of Federal Tribunals include:

   ·      Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board

   ·      Canadian Human Rights Commission

   ·      Canadian Industrial Relations Board

   ·      Social Security Tribunal of Canada - Pension Appeals Board

   ·      The Competition Tribunal

Administrative tribunal decisions can usually be challenged in the courts through appeals or a process called “judicial review”.

 

FOR A FREE 15-MINUTE CONSULTATION, CALL RUNYOWA LAW AT:

1-306-206-2800

 

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**DISCLAIMER: The information on this website is for reference purposes only. It does not constitute legal advice or a contract for legal services with Runyowa Law. If you need formal legal advice in a covered practice area, please contact Runyowa Law at 306-206-2800.